SW Cali Laws

Drone laws in Mexico

There’s few places as fun and interesting to fly your drone than Mexico. Sandy white beaches, picture-perfect blue sea, sunny skies, beautiful jungles and ancient ruins. Oh, and not to forget the hundreds of beautiful colonial towns and monuments that are testimony of the rich history of the country. Mexico is the dream of every drone pilot, yet it is not always easy to get up in the air as regulations tighten and flying drones becomes more difficult.

Flying drones in Mexico

Entering Mexico with a drone

In Mexico, drone pilots encounter two main difficulties, with the first one being surprisingly harder to deal with than the second one. I am talking about even getting the drone into the country. Mexican customs can be tricky, and they can spot a drone owner from a hundred feet. Legally, drones are not within the basket of personal articles a tourist can bring into the country duty-free (like a laptop computer, a camera, a CD player,… – you get it) so it is a welcome target for customs officials who would like to make a bit of extra money.

On my recent visit to the country, I was stopped by customs officials in Guadalajara airport that wanted to confiscate my drone if I don’t pay import taxes and customs fees. No bribing, they did it all officially with a receipt. And there was no escape – I paid about $150 and got an official receipt that would save me from paying again on my next visit. And I was lucky – the customs officer valued my DJI Phantom 4 at about 60% of its market value only. My advice: Bring a small drone like the Mavic Pro so you don’t even get spotted. And make sure you claim the drone is not new and has a low value.

Flying your drone in Mexico

The actual drone regulations in Mexico

But let’s now come to the drone laws themselves. Surprisingly, if you have managed to bring your drone into the country, little will stop you from actually flying it. The drone laws in Mexico are pretty lenient, and they basically only regulate drones above 2 kg take-off weight. If you stay under the 2 kgs, like with the Mavic Pro or a Phantom, you simply need to follow the usual rules of safety like flying only in daylight, staying away from people and government or other sensitive areas as well as remaining within line of sight. Flying close to airports and religious sites and ruins is of course also prohibited.

This way it is relatively easy to enjoy exploring this beautiful country from above. Like any Latin American country, rules are there to be broken – both by you and law enforcement officials. Which means that even if you’re technically ok to fly, a nasty officer could still see it differently, with little to no recourse. So be careful, stay away from trouble, and you will have an amazing time!

 Mexico is the dream of every […]

via Drone laws in Mexico — Phantom Cockpit

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Protecting Your Business: When To Consult An Intellectual Property Lawyer — CBS Los Angeles

Understanding  this critical legal concept is tantamount to the health and well-being of your business. As Darren Dahl of the New York Times points out, through the rise of the internet, protecting your intellectual property has become a necessity. Small businesses are threatened more so, due to the lack of personnel to police intellectual property infringement.

So, let’s decode exactly what intellectual property means, and when you need to call in a lawyer to help your organization.

The Premise

You have an idea, and you want to protect it. That idea could be a product, a logo, or an original concept. Intellectual property law is how you can protect that idea from being copied. Copyrights, patents and trademarks can help ensure your idea remains your.
Copyright

If you’ve created an intellectual work, such as music, printed materials, or blogs, you can claim the work with a submitted original copy of the work, $35 and an application submitted online. No lawyers are needed, at least until you catch someone claiming your work as their own.
Trademark

The steps to establishing a trademark, such as a logo or a phrase, is a bit more involved than copyrighting a work. This is particularly true if you want to extend your trademark overseas. STOPfakes.gov lays out the process by which one can apply for a trademark. Establishing eligibility, searching the established trademark database to make sure your trademark is, in fact, original and then submitting an application will ensure your trademark is protected in the United States. These services are free to boot.
Patents

This area of intellectual property requires a lawyer. Lawyers.com makes no bones about the complexities of patent law. Establishing rights of a product, process or method can get expensive, but there are plenty of resources out there to guide you.
Hopefully, this mini-guide will help you through the world of intellectual property. Your thoughts and ideas are yours. The size of your business shouldn’t discourage you from staking your claims.

 
This article was written by Christopher Millard for CBS Small Business Pulse

Understanding intellectual property law can be critical to the health and well-being of your small business.

via Protecting Your Business: When To Consult An Intellectual Property Lawyer — CBS Los Angeles

Rule 502(d) Orders: The Most Effective and Underused Protection against Privilege Waivers

Rule 502(d) Orders: The Most Effective and Underused Protection against Privilege Waivers

by PLC Litigation
Originally Published on 05 Mar 2013 • USA (National/Federal)

This Legal Update highlights the advisability of entering into a Rule 502(d) order under the Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE), which allows parties to provide for the return of privileged documents produced during discovery without fear that the disclosure waives the attorney-client privilege or work product protection. Surprisingly, Rule 502(d) orders are currently underused by federal court practitioners, despite being favored by federal judges.

FRE 502 was enacted in 2008 in response to widespread complaints that the cost of protecting against waivers of attorney-client privilege or work product protection during discovery has become prohibitive because of the concern that even an inadvertent or insubstantial disclosure waives protected communications or information (see Advisory Committee Notes to FRE 502), particularly in cases involving e-discovery, which may encompass a large number of documents. Rule 502(a) and (b) explain under what circumstances the unintentional disclosure of privileged information does and does not constitute a waiver of privilege.
Under Rule 502(d), however, the court may issue an order providing that a party’s disclosure of documents protected by the attorney-client privilege or work product protection does not waive the privilege (unless there was an intent to waive the privilege). According to the Advisory Committee notes, this is true even when a party produced documents without conducting any screening for privileged material (see Advisory Committee Notes to FRE 502(d)).
Rule 502(d) order is a unique discovery tool because:
  • The no-waiver effect also applies in other federal and state court proceedings.
  • The parties may incorporate into the order a specific and detailed agreement regarding its scope and effect in the litigation.
  • Privileged documents must be returned to the disclosing party “irrespective of the care taken by” the party in reviewing them prior to production.
  • The court may issue the order sua sponte, without the parties’ agreement.
(FRE 502(d) and (e) and Advisory Committee Notes to FRE 502(d).)
Judges favor Rule 502(d) orders because they are designed to reduce the cost of privilege review and allow parties to review and produce documents expeditiously and without lengthy and expensive motion practice regarding potential waivers of privilege. Recently, several judges have expressed their approval of Rule 502(d) orders and relied on them to find that a party’s disclosure of privileged documents did not waive the attorney-client privilege or work product protection. For example:
  • Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York opined that it is malpractice to not seek a Rule 502(d) order from the court before the commencement of document discovery (see View from the Bench: Judges on E-Discovery at LegalTech Day Two, Law Technology News, Evan Koblentz (Jan. 31, 2013)).
  • In Chevron Corp. v. The Weinberg Group, the court entered a Rule 502(d) order allowing the defendant to knowingly produce privileged materials without waiving any privileges regarding the subject matter of the documents in any proceeding (Misc. Action No. 11-409, at *1 n.1 (D.D.C. Oct. 26, 2012)). Magistrate Judge John M. Facciola wrote that he was “troubled that the [defendant] has just now discovered Rule 502(d), the use of which may have prevented the protracted litigation and discovery battles that have plagued this case for the past two years.”
  • In Rajala v. McGuire Woods, LLP, the court held that an inadvertently produced document did not waive privilege and could be taken back by the producing party (clawed back) because the court had entered a Rule 502(d) order before the disclosure. The court determined that the terms of the Rule 502(d) order, and not the provisions of Rule 502(a) and (b), governed the handling of inadvertently produced documents and noted that the purpose of the order was to reduce the time and costs involved in a document-by-document privilege review (No. 08-cv-2638, , at *5 (D. Kan. Jan. 3, 2013)).
  • In Brookfield Asset Management, Inc. v. AIG Financial Products Corp., the court held that the Rule 502(d) order issued by the court before the defendant’s production of privileged documents gave the defendant the right to claw back those documents “no matter what the circumstances giving rise to their production were” (No. 09-cv-8285, , at *1 (S.D.N.Y. Jan. 7, 2013)).
For an example of a claw-back provision that parties may incorporate into a confidentiality order or an FRE 502(d) order, and for additional information on Rule 502(d) generally, see Standard Clause, Privilege Waiver Clause with Claw-Back Provision.

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RESOURCE ID 5-524-7065DOCUMENT TYPE Legal update: archive

PRODUCTSPLC US Federal Litigation, PLC US Law Department

© 2017 THOMSON REUTERS. NO CLAIM TO ORIGINAL U.S. GOVERNMENT WORKS.

 

‘The Suffering Is Staggering.’ Victims Could Get $4.1 Million After Needless Cancer Treatments via TIME

(DETROIT) — An expert is recommending approval of $4.1 million in claims, including $2rodwin million in funeral costs, filed by victims of a Detroit-area doctor who committed fraud by putting hundreds of patients through needless cancer treatments.

Randi Roth gave an update Tuesday to a judge who is overseeing the case of Dr. Farid Fata. She said 81 percent of 741 claims are fully or partly eligible for restitution.

Fata is serving a 45-year prison sentence for fraud, money laundering and conspiracy. He admitted putting patients through grueling chemotherapy — even when they didn’t have cancer.

Fata’s victims can seek reimbursement for funeral costs, remedial health care and mental health treatment. Out-of-pocket costs paid to the doctor and his clinics are also eligible for repayment.

Pain and suffering and lost wages, however, aren’t covered.

“The suffering is staggering,” said Roth, an attorney in St. Paul, Minnesota, who specializes in deciding claims in large-scale litigation. “All of us want to help as much as possible but the law is strict.”

Final approval in the months ahead rests with U.S. District Judge Paul Borman. The restitution process includes a way for patients or their family to appeal if Roth determined a claim wasn’t eligible.

“This is a huge situation with tragic consequences. I’m going to be on top of it,” Borman said.

The judge said patients and families are first in line for restitution, followed by insurance companies and the federal government’s Medicare program.

Outside court, Teddy Howard, 57, of suburban Detroit said he’s frustrated. He said his claim has been rejected because his doctors won’t certify that some of his subsequent health care was related to the harm caused by repeated doses of chemotherapy ordered by Fata.

Howard said he had a liver transplant and has also lost eight teeth.

“I didn’t think I’d be crawling around, begging. This is crazy,” he said.

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(DETROIT) — An expert is recommending approval of $4.1 million in claims, including $2 million in funeral costs, filed by victims of a Detroit-area doctor who committed fraud by putting hundreds of patients through needless cancer treatments. Randi Roth gave an update Tuesday to a judge who is overseeing the case of Dr. Farid Fata.…

via ‘The Suffering Is Staggering.’ Victims Could Get $4.1 Million After Needless Cancer Treatments — TIME

Patient Hospital Rights via WTTV

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Questions, accusations, and malpractice claims all surround a neurosurgeon who practiced in central Indiana for decades.

According to patients, Dr. John T. Cummings abruptly left Community Health Network two years ago with no explanation.

Some patients just want to know what happened to their neurosurgeon, but others contacted CBS4 Problem Solvers with their concerns, so we started investigating.

Former patient Lisa Bryant stepped forward first, saying she wants to know the truth and she filed a medical malpractice claim with the Indiana Department of Insurance against Cummings and Community Health Network.

“We had a connection. … I thought he was a very nice man,” Bryant said.

Bryant first saw Cummings for leg and back pain in 2013. She said pretty quickly, he told her surgery was her best option.

“I felt comfortable,” Bryant said.

Coming out of that surgery, though, Bryant said her condition worsened and she underwent more surgeries, enduring more pain that still continues to this day.

“It’s bad. Some days I wake up, three or four o’clock in the morning, I cry. It hurts,” Bryant said.

It’s that pain, and the questions Bryant said still linger, that caused her to reach out. Bryant said in the midst of her treatment, Cummings left Community Health with no explanation.

“I was really thinking this is all normal, and it’s not,” Bryant said.

CBS4 Problem Solvers found that Bryant is not the only patient with questions, and in some cases, accusations.

The Indiana Department of Insurance posts medical malpractice claims on a public database online. In the last four years, 15 patients have filed claims against Cummings. Two of those cases have since been dismissed.

Randy Stohler filed one of the now-dismissed cases. His sister, Teresa Knight, said her family couldn’t see a path forward with the claim after Stohler died from a heart attack earlier this year.

“It is hard, we do talk about him a lot, what if? He has a daughter and he’s got two very young granddaughters,” Knight said.

Knight said she was with her brother for a spinal surgery in June of 2015, and a year later, when he decided to take action.

“We were sitting at the house one day and kind of talking. He says, ‘You know Teresa … I think I need to see an attorney,’” Knight said.

Stohler’s family voluntarily dismissed his claim after his death, but 13 cases against Cummings remain active.

Those cases vary widely in how much detail patients reveal in their complaints, but many patients describe undergoing complicated spinal surgeries. More than one accuse Cummings of performing “unnecessary” surgery or going “directly to surgery” instead of seeking “conservative treatment.”

Other patients describe “severe pain” and the need for “additional” procedures or corrective surgeries.

It’s important to note that medical malpractice claims are common and neurosurgery is a field where the risk of surgery can be incredibly high. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine ranked neurosurgery as the number one field for lawsuits, with nearly 20 percent of all neurosurgeons facing a malpractice claim each year.

CBS4 Problem Solvers wanted to get an explanation, but Community Health Network declined our request for an interview and refused to answer multiple questions.

A spokesperson for the hospital system would only confirm Cummings’ dates of employment, which started in 2010 and ended on December 10, 2015.

In Indiana, medical malpractice claims must be reviewed by a panel of three doctors before a lawsuit can proceed in court. Most cases take years to resolve.

Only one panel has convened in a case against Cummings since 2014. This August, that panel came to the “unanimous opinion” that he and Community Health Network “failed to comply with the appropriate standard of care.” The case involved a woman who said Cummings “improperly placed hardware” in her spine during a surgery.

Additionally, an earlier 2011 case alleging that a piece of equipment “entered the spinal canal” during surgery, causing the patient to be permanently disabled, was allowed to go forward based on a 2014 panel decision.

That case, however, was instead settled for $1,000,000, a month after Cummings left the hospital.

Michael Ellington had no idea he would be one of Cummings’ last patients. After surgery in December 2015, Ellington said he tried to get in touch with the doctor about his pain.

Ellington later received a letter, telling patients “effective immediately, Dr. John T. Cummings will no longer see patients at Community.”

Ellington said another doctor diagnosed him with a spinal fluid leak and he underwent a second surgery.

“I haven’t been the same since,” Ellington said.

It’s unclear whether the claims, and their timing, are linked to Cummings’ parting from Community. The surgeon faced more than a dozen malpractice claims prior to 2014 and a majority were dismissed, or medical panels found no malpractice.

There are also patients who say they received great care from the surgeon. One told Community Health Network on Facebook, “You lost a top notch surgeon … (who) saved my back and kept me walking.”

Another patient even created a Facebook group dedicated to search for Cummings after his departure, saying “he remains undoubtedly one of the best neurosurgeons in Indianapolis.”

Cummings was also featured as a “Top Doctor” in Indianapolis Monthly magazine in 2013 and 2015.

Hospital tax records show that in 2011, Cummings was one of Community Health’s highest paid physicians, making more than $1.2 million.

What is clear, is that many patients want to know what happened to Cummings; but in the case of Bryant, Ellington, and Knight, it’s because they say they’re concerned.

“We have no idea, but certainly there is a problem,” Knight said.

“Definitely I believe that I’m not the only one,” Bryant said.

CBS4 Problem Solvers tried to find Cummings to get his side of the story. He appeared to still be living in the area, and a woman who identified herself as his wife said via Facebook that he had not been practicing because of what she called an “exclusive clause” with Community Health Network, which ends next month, exactly two years after his last day.

Lawyers for Cummings did not return repeated requests for comment.

Even though a medical panel found Cummings responsible in one case in August, they also recommended his name not be forwarded to the Medical Licensing Board for fitness to practice.

The board renewed Cummings’ Indiana medical license a few weeks ago.

CBS4 Problem Solvers wants to hear from patients, whether you’ve had a good or bad experience. You can contact us at ProblemSolvers@cbs4indy.com or (317) 677-1544.

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Questions, accusations, and malpractice claims all surround a neurosurgeon who practiced in central Indiana for decades. According to patients, Dr. John T. Cummings abruptly left Community Health Network two years ago with no explanation. Some patients just want to know what happened to their neurosurgeon, but others contacted CBS4 Problem Solvers with…

via Patients search for neurosurgeon who abruptly left major hospital system — CBS 4 – Indianapolis News, Weather, Traffic and Sports | WTTV

Las Vegas shooting: Nevada has some of the most relaxed gun laws in America — Global News

The deadliest mass shooting in modern American history was carried out Sunday night in a state that has some of the most relaxed gun laws in the country. 

The shooter, identified by police as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, opened fire from the upper floors of the Mandalay Bay hotel and casino in Las Vegas around 10 p.m. local time, resulting in the deaths of at least 58 people and the injury of over 500 others.

He then reportedly turned a gun on himself.

The state constitution in Nevada gives citizens like Paddock the “the right to keep and bear arms for security and defense, for lawful hunting and recreational use and for other lawful purposes.”

WATCH: BC couple describes hearing gunshots for ’45 minutes’ as they fled bullets

RELATED

Paddock would not have been breaking any laws by openly carrying a gun into the casino, as open carry is permitted in the state. However, most casinos in Las Vegas may ask you to leave if you are touting a firearm — let alone nearly a dozen.

As is the case with most hotels, however, Paddock would likely have been able to bring the guns undetected to his room without being searched or questioned.

Before carrying out the massacre, Paddock could have purchased his firearms (there were at least eight to 10 in his room, according to officials) without a permit, and without registering them with the state or holding a state-issued gun license. None of those is required for gun owners in Nevada.

In fact, the only thing you need a permit for is carrying a concealed weapon.

If there were, as reported, machine guns or rifles in Paddock’s arsenal, they would also have been legal, as long as they were registered and possessed in adherence with federal law, according to the National Rifle Association. A federal ban on assault weapons enacted in 1994 expired a decade later, in 2004.

There would have been no limit on the number of guns Paddock could own, and no limit on the number of bullets each magazine could hold.

Background checks and exceptions

Anyone buying a gun from a licensed retailer in Nevada is subject to a background check. But anyone buying a gun privately (online or in person) from another gun owner normally has no background check done at all, in spite of an effort to implement that requirement last year.

WATCH: President Trump pledges support to Las Vegas shooting victims

In November 2016, voters in Nevada passed Question 1, a resolution calling for background checks through a licensed gun dealer for all sales in the state, by the thinnest of margins. But local authorities said it would be unenforceable due to a lack of co-operation from the FBI in administering the expanded checks.

Nevada, like most states, does have a long list of exceptions for gun ownership. A resident cannot own or carry a firearm if they have been convicted (in any state) of a misdemeanour crime of domestic violence or any felony that carries a maximum prison sentence of over one year.

READ MORE: 2 Manitobans injured in Las Vegas attack

The same goes for a fugitive from justice, anyone under 18 years of age, any unlawful user of a controlled substance (yes, even marijuana), anyone committed to a mental health facility by a U.S. court, anyone pleading guilty but mentally ill in court, anyone found guilty but mentally ill in court, anyone acquitted by reason of insanity, or anyone who is in the United States illegally.

The laws next door

Nevada’s relatively permissive gun laws are all the more striking when you consider that its next-door neighbour, California, has some of the tightest firearms regulations in the United States.

READ MORE: Alarming number of Americans continue to carry guns into Canada

Among other things, California requires all gun sales to be processed through a licensed dealer and for the purchaser to be subject to a background check.

The state has banned most assault weapons and .50 calibre rifles and forbids the sale, transfer, manufacture, and possession of large capacity magazines (over 10 rounds). Anyone buying a gun needs a Firearm Safety Certificate, which requires passing a written test.

There is a 10-day waiting period prior to the sale or transfer of any gun.

The state also has some of the broadest powers for seizing weapons in America. In early 2016, for instance, California enacted a statute giving police or family members the option to petition the courts to seize guns and ammunition from someone they think poses a threat.

The deadliest mass shooting in American history was carried out Sunday night in a state that has some of the most relaxed gun laws in America. Continue reading →

via Las Vegas shooting: Nevada has some of the most relaxed gun laws in America — Global News

What to Do If the New Car You Bought Is a Lemon

When you purchase a new car, you would expect nothing less than for it to behave according with its specification. You would expect the engine to purr like a cat and all other systems to be fully operational and operate within specified parameters. Sadly, in many cases the reality contradicts the expectancy. Due to numerous reasons, from manufacturing to shipping problem, the car you have just bought may turn out to be just a burdening lemon. The next logical question is what to do if the new car you bought is a lemon. Should you attempt to solve your case on your own or hire a lawyer?

The first reaction which comes natural for most of the drivers in this situate is to take matters in their own hands and talk with the dealer. Unfortunately, this method is rarely successful. When hearing about lemon cars, lemon laws, refunds or changing cars, most of the dealers will try to prolong the process or totally avoid it, by asking for numerous call backs. Even worse, you can expect your pleas to reach deaf ears and end up with unread messages.

Even when the dealer seems to cooperate, things can reach a stalemate. Dealers may claim to investigate the case and put you on hold, sometimes even for months. In fact, they expect you to mentally crack and renounce the claims.

Things may totally change when hiring an experienced lemon law attorney. Working with a specialist will help settle the case faster and with more chances for a desired resolution. Of course, the first step when contacting a lemon law attorney is to provide as much info you have. Discuss about the encountered problems and present all documents to support your claims, including repair bills and repair shops’ notes. You will need to provide:
– Purchase contract or lease agreement
– Vehicle’s warranty documentation
– Bills, invoices and receipts, including repair receipts
– Communication info with the car’s dealer

If repairs were made and the problem still persists, you must disclose the number of repair attempts. In many states, a car is considered a lemon only after a certain number of unsuccessful repair attempts. Your lawyer will review all the documents you have before submission.

The next step is to submit your claim to the manufacturer. It usually takes around a month until the manufacture provides a reply. The manufacturer can either approve the claim and offer to refund or repurchase the car or it can deny the claim, invoking various reasons.

If you can a claim denial, you may proceed to arbitration or litigation. The lemon law attorney will represent your case before court. An experienced attorney will help the customer get his money back if the vehicle qualifies under state’s lemon laws. Click here!

Our company provides elite used lemon law rights specialists, with a vast experience and unquestionable reputation. Please visit the provided links for more details.

Lemon Law Attorney in Los Angeles |Zolonz

When you purchase a new car, you would expect nothing less than for it to behave according with its specification. You would expect the engine to purr like a cat and all other systems to be fully operational and operate within specified parameters. Sadly, in many cases the reality contradicts the expectancy. Due to numerous reasons, from manufacturing to shipping problem, the car you have just bought may turn out to be just a burdening lemon. The next logical question is what to do if the new car you bought is a lemon. Should you attempt to solve your case on your own or hire a lawyer?

The first reaction which comes natural for most of the drivers in this situate is to take matters in their own hands and talk with the dealer. Unfortunately, this method is rarely successful. When hearing about lemon cars, lemon laws, refunds or changing…

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Blog: PRODUCT RECALLS : Consumer Reports ★ ★ ★ ★

Applying analytics to the product recall process via Jones and Robinson

Applying analytics to the product recall process via Jones and Robinson

Given the pervasiveness of AI and analytics across all aspects of operation, it is not surprising that these are also being applied to to the product recall process. This Deloitte article provides five top tips for implementing this successfully. The headlines are: Do not be overwhelmed by the data Do not wait for ‘perfect’ data […]

Best Custom Controllers for PlayStation 4 — AIVAnet

When you get tired of looking at the plain black controllers with your PlayStation 4, it might be time to start looking at a few different types of custom controller designs. Custom designed controllers like the Space Illuminating design add a brand new taste of flavor to your gaming. The best way to improve the […]

Food safety tips during power failure — PesPro

USDA Food Safety‏ Currently affected by a power outage or did your power just come back on? Be sure to follow these tips when going through your refrigerator or freezer via Food safety tips during power failure — PesPro

Oreo to release cake-flavored cookie in celebration of Mickey Mouse’s 90th birthday — WHNT.com

Happy Birthday, Mickey Mouse! Disney’s iconic mouse turns 90 this year and to celebrate, Disney has teamed up with Oreo for a special birthday treat. According to ABC News, Oreo is releasing limited-edition, birthday cake-flavored cookies to mark the 90th anniversary of Mickey Mouse. .@Disney and @Oreo are celebrating Mickey Mouse’s 90th birthday with limited-edition […]

Sewing needles have been found DELIBERATELY hidden inside strawberries at Aussie supermarkets as man is rushed to hospital after swallowing one via The Scottish Sun

A DISGRUNTLED former supermarket worker deliberately put sewing needles in strawberries, it was alleged today. Customers in Australia have been told to return or throw away punnets of the fruit due to the contamination after a man who swallowed one was rushed to hospital. [bc_video video_id=”5834775015001″ account_id=”5067014667001″ player_id=”default” embed=”in-page” padding_top=”56%” autoplay=”” min_width=”0px” max_width=”640px” width=”100%” height=”100%” […]